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[ ringtone solutions ]

Production: Write us to find out more about our rates for Ringtone conversions and our original ringtone productions. We produce Truetones, Realtones and Polyphonic ringtones in the following formats:



amr

mp3

wav

mid

mmf
download download download download download

Distribution: We also distribute content to aggragators (Link between mobile operators and content providers). This assures that your ringtones are sold all over the world via Internet, WAP sites and various Mobile Networks.


Contact us for Ringtones:

Contact us for Distribution:


$ Ringtone sales last year in the US were over US$80 million.

$ Global Ringtone market is US$2.5 billion a year.

$ Ringtone Market to double to US$4 Billion by 2008





Its a mobile world out there and someone has got to encode it!

Tuned Out

Ever since Metallica first declared war on the growing army of teenage file-sharers, the online music arena has attracted a steady stream of law suits, polemics, and predictions of impending doom. But recent events have seen a redrawing of enemy lines. Ironically, it now looks as though embracing rather than attacking digital networks will be the key to the recording industry's survival.

One of the most controversial questions in music circles is the impact of illegal file-sharing on album sales. If you believe the record labels, the decline of CD sales is due to the scourge of copyright infringing cyber geeks. In fact, rather than cannibalizing album sales, there is growing evidence that file-sharing may either have no impact, or even a positive effect on sales in traditional channels. The debate warmed up recently in a study by two professors at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After selecting 680 songs on albums and comparing the downloaded rate to the weekly sales figures, the professors concluded that file-sharing has a statistically insignificant impact on record sales.

Indeed, if anything, album sales are doing well, thank you very much. According to the most recent Nielsen SoundScan report, overall US music sales (which includes CDs, legal downloads and DVDs), rose 9.1 percent in the first three months of the year over the same period in 2003. Album sales increased 9.2 percent, and sales of CDs, which represent 96 percent of album sales, rose 10.6 percent. JUST AS radio airplay stimulates consumer demand, the network effect of downloading of music tracks and online word of mouth can support the popularity of artists, in turn driving album sales.

Once again, it is all about marketing and distribution. Whilst there are scattered stories of artists making inroads by way of online self promotion, the vast majority of downloaded songs are by performers who have benefited from the record labels' considerable marketing apparatus. There is, after all, a good reason why no one can name an album recorded by Prince during his ‘distribute-via-the-Net’ phase - no one heard about them!

That said, as a distribution platform, file-sharing networks are becoming increasingly important sources of marketing information. Labels are testing the popularity of their artists and new listening trends, and finding new ways to test what songs to actually release as a single. Many labels, despite publicly condemning and staging mass lawsuits against the likes of KaZaA, Morpheus and Grokster, secretly use research companies such as BigChampagne to track the trends in online music download services on the very networks they are suing.

Petty disputes aside, the bottom line for the music LABELS IS that secure, copyright protected digital distribution has the potential to revitalize an aging business. Legal downloading services, such as the Apple iTunes store are an important step towards accommodating the consumer desire to have more control over their consumption of entertainment products, and lend credence to the notion that people will behave responsibly when presented with a viable business model.

The real messiah for the music mafia, however, is actually the humble, if not slightly irritating ringtone. Distribution of music in the ringtone format on mobile devices has already eclipsed the sales of traditional singles, and is well on the way to become a major channel for revenue growth for both artists and labels. According to the Yankee Group, ringtone sales last year in the US were over US$80 million, out of a global market of US$2.5 billion.

Considered in this light, the aggressive campaigns by the RIAA and their law suits on individuals seems not only short-sighted also ignorant of the seismic shifts in consumer behaviour. The trend towards digital consumption of entertainment is not only unlikely to harm the music industry in the long term, but are already delivering profitable new channels for distribution and marketing.



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